Be the Light

I often hear and sense a good deal of confusion out there regarding religion v. spirituality.  Are they one in the same, for instance?  Or why do I need to worry about my spiritual life when I’m a religious person? First of all, they aren’t one in the same.  Religion often comes prepackaged as “organized religion.”  Spirituality is about finding your true nature–your spiritual essence within–and learning how to live from a more enlightened perspective.  Religion has a more external focus; spirituality is usually discovered within.

  • What is my definition of spirituality?  Spirituality is creating a path and a practice that allows you to discover your internal light.  It’s about sharing that light with others, providing comfort, inspiration, and wisdom; it’s knowing we are all more than surface impressions; it’s having faith in the human experience.
  • But as we close our 4-month retreat with Week 17 of Beyond Self 2012, I would like to encourage all of you to revisit prior posts in this informal online retreat and then develop your own working definition of spirituality.  What resonates with you?  What will give you focus going forward?  How will you nurture your spiritual practice?

And if you still don’t quite understand the pressing urgency of spiritual growth within each person, remember: we all contribute to universal energy through our thoughts, actions, attitudes, and awareness.  We are all interconnected as mortal beings, so it is extremely important to get beyond an attitude of “well, that happened to the other guy, so it’s of no real concern to me.”  A peaceful world, an enlightened world, is not the responsibility of someone else.  It is a responsibility we all share.  And if you truly believe you have “mastered” all of this, please look again.  And again.

During this retreat we have focused quite a bit on the teachings of various Zen masters.  I always find it worthwhile to explore their words, their poetry, their message.  There is a timeless quality to Zen teachings.  Consider this from Muso Soseki (1275-1351) … (English version by poet laureate, W.S. Merwin):

Toki-no-Ge (Satori poem, meaning: a state of sudden spiritual enlightenment)

Year after year
I dug in the earth
looking for the blue of heaven
only to feel
the pile of dirt
choking me
until once in the dead of night
I tripped on a broken brick
and kicked it into the air
and saw that without a thought
I had smashed the bones
of the empty sky

I wish you all well in your continuing efforts to develop a spiritual practice that comforts you and others.  That brings you to eventual enlightenment.  It may be that life has not challenged you yet sufficiently … not enough to motivate you to seek deeper answers within.  But that day will most likely arrive, as the primary purpose of life is to find ourselves: in the spiritual sense.  The external world is simply here to help us along the way.  So, rest assured, one day you will be challenged to grow in ways you can’t even imagine.  As Eckhart Tolle likes to say: “Life never leaves you alone.”  Of course it doesn’t.  But since we are life, it is all one in the same, isn’t it?

Our task (and our challenge) is to welcome life in all it many forms and guises.  To know that what happens to someone else, also happens to you — to the collective mortal family — and when you (and all of us) begin to take responsibility for the good, the bad, the in-between … we, finally, will be making spiritual strides.  Then you will find a need and a reason to look within for a deeper reality, one that offers a lasting light.  Then you will decide to quit hiding behind the make-believe notion of “that would never happen to me or to my family.”  It is happening,  and it’s happening right now.  But difficult issues will not be solved on a purely mortal scale; we’ve tried that, haven’t we?  Go beyond.  Look at the world with “new eyes.”

I encourage you to return often to this 4-month retreat, our 17 weeks of study called Beyond Self 2012, to refresh and refine your spiritual practice.  To find encouragement.  Or maybe to continue the journal you began in September.  Let your intuition speak to you in ways you haven’t really noticed until now.  

I would also like to wish you an amazing new year!  May insights abound; may your awareness deepen and grow.  And may you become the light: for yourself, for others, for the world.

  • Please note: SunnyRoomStudio will be on winter break until further notice.

Until then, you are welcome to read posts you may have missed in 2012.  And the Studio Guests page can help you find guest posts.  Or you may wish to simply focus on our retreat, since we did cover a lot of ground.  Thanks, as always, for stopping by my sunny space for kindred spirits.  See you soon!

  • Comments will be open periodically, but I encourage you to consider personal reflection in lieu of.
  • Here is a recap of our retreat posts …

Week One: Extend Your Gaze
Week Two:
Always Evaluating
Week Three:
Being Brevity
Week Four:
Entanglement
Week Five:
Beyond Attachment
Week Six:
Eternal Nature
Week Seven:
If Only
Week Eight:
Nonresistance
Week Nine:
Caught Up
Week Ten:
Daily Life
Week Eleven:
Just Look
Week Twelve:
Transcendence
Week Thirteen: Awareness
Week Fourteen: Steadiness
Week Fifteen: Winter Grass
Week Sixteen:
Endings
Week Seventeen: Be the Light

Thank you so much for joining me for this 17-week journey Beyond Self 2012.

  • Also, during this winter break, I invite you to enjoy some of my Kindred Spirit Quotes.  Or you may enjoy browsing the Books & Authors page.

At any moment you have a choice,
that either leads you closer to your spirit,
or further away from it.
~ Thich Nhat Hanh

Blog posts by DazyDayWriter @ work in SunnyRoomStudio: all rights reserved.

Endings

Finding peace after personal tragedy takes years, perhaps, a lifetime. We must recognize the long-term nature of healing and avoid the “instant response” mindset that is integral to our impatient, short-sighted culture and society.

Welcome to Week 16 of Beyond Self 2012 in SunnyRoomStudio — a creative, sunny space for kindred spirits.  As those of you know who have been following our informal spiritual retreat since September, our retreat closes next Friday, 12-28.  And today I had intended to post something very brief, like last week, so we could capture the spirit of Zen — its simplicity, its ability to shine a light on issues and obstacles we stumble over routinely.  But in the wake of sudden loss, the devastating tragedy in Connecticut, I’ve decided to dedicate this blog post to all of us who are struggling to understand this moment in time.  Especially, however, I would like to dedicate this to the parents, the children, and all of the families impacted directly and indirectly by this alarming loss of life.  I am so sorry and extend my deepest condolences.

As a culture, as a world, we are not good at endings.  Especially endings that are considered tragic.  And I do speak from personal experience.

But my son has been gone since June of 2007, so I have had the luxury of time to experience firsthand the many dimensions of loss.  I have had time to realize the paradoxical nature of loss, how it is truly everywhere–an inevitable part of life itself–yet each loss is also a unique occurrence.  The history that preceded it, the context and the impact, the changes and challenges that follow … each one of us could tell a slightly different story about our experience of loss and how, in many ways, it comes to define us.  It is not something we “move on” from, however.  Rather, loss becomes part of who we are, evolving as we do.  And though I am still finding my “public voice” on this subject, I would like to offer my support to anyone who is grappling with the demands of grief.

But my intent here today is to simply offer a few words of understanding.  Many many words have been uttered and written about this tragedy and barely a week has elapsed.  Everyone has an opinion it seems; everyone wants to frame “the” problem differently.  Yet, the heated debates that have been launched and sustained are merely symptoms of more deep-seated challenges.  Friction has erupted on blogs, on television, in homes and in workplaces, and unfortunately, we (as a collective) have even acted with a degree of violence per our reactions.  And yet we continue to wonder why violence happens in its most extreme forms.

ReallyIs it that mysterious?

Consider these words from Eckhart Tolle: “Once you have dis-identified from your mind, whether you are right or wrong makes no difference to your sense of self at all, so the forcefully compulsive and deeply unconscious need to be right, which is a form of violence, will no longer be there.”

Indeed, violence takes on many forms.  And Tolle makes a valid point.  Are we numb to the most insidious forms of violence, thereby allowing the more apparent and obvious forms to manifest in the first place?  Should we be looking at our own attitudes and proclivities for guidance on the bigger questions that swirl in the air like insistent dots on the universal radar screen, especially since Friday, December 14, 2012?

Gary Zukav (author, spiritual leader) recently noted that “the origin of the violence that erupted in Newtown is in us.”  He suggests we look inside ourselves.  “What is in you is in the world. When you change yourself, you change the world.”

  • Zukav bio highlights: In 1979, The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics, plumbed the depths of quantum physics and relativity, winning The American Book Award for Science. In 1989, The Seat of the Soul led the way to seeing the alignment of the personality and the soul as the fulfillment of life and captured the imagination of millions, becoming the #1 New York Times bestseller thirty-one times and remaining on the New York Times bestseller list for three years.

The entire point of this informal spiritual retreat in SunnyRoomStudio has been to look beyond the “I” of the moment … to find the spiritual dimension in our lives and to weave it into the very fabric of daily life.  Since September we have been focusing on elements of Zen each week.  As we have just witnessed in CT, each “I” is temporary, impermanent, and  clearly, fleeting.  Sometimes more suddenly than we could ever have anticipated.  Sometimes in ways that leave us staggering and defeated.  I have posted about loss previously … looked closely at the elements of grief, death and dying, in my own life.

In fact, one reason I launched this site 3 years ago was to bring more light into the world in the aftermath of heartbreaking loss.

So my heart goes out to each and every person directly and indirectly impacted by the eruption of senseless violence in a school … a place of learning, of friendship, of assumed safety.  But schools aren’t perfect either.  They come with flaws like everything else.

Students, teachers, parents, families … all mortal.  All subject to human limitations and challenges.  (If you are interested in digging deeper into the diversity of family systems, I highly recommend Andrew Solomon’s new book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity.)

But one thing is clear to me.  Life is not meant to be predictable, nor routine, nor without strife, struggle, and obstacles that threaten to overwhelm us.

As Eckhart Tolle has suggested, life is not designed to make us happy.  Life is meant to wake us up (in the spiritual sense).

And sometimes endings can be catalysts for greater understanding.  They can help us to grow spiritually, because the mind resists, and has trouble comprehending the reality of death.  Yet, spiritually, if we accept the challenge,  a certain “knowing” will come with time — a “knowing” that is far deeper than surface explanations.

But if we continue to operate from ego, from a reactive mind that wants to be right no matter what, and without a degree of mindfulness, the status quo will be ours to experience for time unknown.  The forms may change; the outward expression of violence may change.  But to truly alter deep-seated patterns within cultures and societies, it will likely take a shift in consciousness.  We will not only have to look within at self, we will have to go beyond self to find our spiritual roots and to live from a more enlightened perspective.

  • What are you doing to explore your level of consciousness … especially before you speak, or act, or assume?  Just venture back through the 15 weeks of study we have just completed here, pick any week, and see if you have actually absorbed the deeper message.  Or look to any of our spiritual leaders for guidance.  Commit to a different world by committing to your own spiritual evolution.  We will not have one without the other.

I am finally hearing people talk about our “culture of violence” in reference to CT.  This vantage point will take us closer to solutions than anything else.

We are so used to violence, even in its most subtle forms.  Even in “socially acceptable” forms.  Within organizations and institutions of all sizes; within political structures; within family systems that are nearly always dysfunctional in one way or another.  Let’s start with a fresh look at what we encounter each day, at what we contribute to relationships, to workplaces, to potentially controversial situations.  (Are we addicted to controversy?)  Let’s consider how the small things add up to big things.

Our world is waiting for change.  Hoping for change.  But as we all know, we must be the change we envision.

This week, for our retreat, and for those of you who are keeping a journal in lieu of leaving comments (they have been closed since September when we began this spiritual journey), take a step back.  Try to put yourself in the shoes of the parents who lost young children; try to feel their pain, their anguish, before you jump in with assumptions and solutions of old — with your ideas of what must be done.  Get some perspective.  Meditate.  Seek out spiritual wisdom.  Pray.  Envision the world you want to live in.  We are not going to solve the problem of violence this week or next week.  It will take a shift in consciousness that must come from within each person.  And if you think you are already there, I invite you to look again.

Go beyond self … shine a light on your “certainty.”  On your “need to know.”

  • Shine a light on a deeper truth, on your own humanity and what it means to care, to show compassion, to consistently act from a place of internal peace.  The gap is wide.  The bridge is not yet apparent.  You will have to construct it, one breath at a time.

As many of you know, I have been working on a memoir about the loss of my son and have recently completed a draft.  I was planning to write the second draft next year.  But we’ll have to see how I feel upon review of the manuscript.  In its current form it at least conveys the complexities of life that defy simple solutions, black and white thinking, and assumptions of old.  I did my graduate work in sociology, so obviously, I understand well the powerful influence of society in our lives.  Indeed, its influence is everywhere, because it is everywhere.

Adam Lanza may have been behind the trigger in the mind-numbing tragedy that has everyone glued to televisions and social media, but we can be sure our society and culture played a role in his evolution as a human being.  How do we relate to troubled children in our schools, in our homes and beyond?  Or even if they aren’t considered “troubled,” how do we relate to children who don’t fit the one-size-fits-all conformity mold … who seem to have unique needs and abilities?  Have we really made mental health a priority in this country?  Are we a compassionate and empathetic world?  Are we really supporting the diversity of life that is our planet?

While meaningful answers can be difficult to find, we must first see the problems anew.  We must look with “new eyes” if we are to find more peaceful and effective ways to live.  And sometimes, with humility, we must also come to see our need for greater spiritual awareness.  In this journey called life, we are all kindred spirits.

  • In closing I would like to share a personal message about grief.  I wish I could tell the parents who lost young children last week these things.

First of all, forget time … this won’t feel real for years to come … the reality of loss dawns very very slowly and only in stages, as we are ready.  It could easily be 5 years or more before you come full circle with this deafening experience.  Allow yourself all the time you need.  Please don’t try to conform to arbitrary standards generated by society, friends, or family.  There is no “right” way to grieve.  And, most of all, insist on keeping your children in your life … only their form has changed.  Honor their memory in ways that bring you comfort.  To deny their ongoing presence in your life is terribly painful and unnecessary.  The memory of those we’ve lost looms large this time of year, but by keeping your children in your lives, you can honor a deeper reality.  Most of all, take very good care of yourself.  Your energy level will be low for a long time.  Allow it.  There are physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual reactions to grief.  Expect to feel and act differently; honor your human needs.  Time does not heal all wounds, but its passage can provide perspective, eventually.  My concern and blessings to all of you.

Grief is never linear, it flows somewhere outside of time … and it knows no boundaries. Indeed, it is direct contact with the greatest unknown, and how we begin to learn who we are at our deepest level.  ~ D.A. Hickman, Kindred Spirit Quotes

Next Friday, our retreat, Beyond Self 2012, will conclude with Week 17.  Until then I wish you a peaceful holiday season.

May it be a time of meaningful reflection and deepening spiritual awareness.

May you acknowledge, as never before, the interconnectedness of everything.

May you discover “new eyes” with which to see your life and its expression.

Do you not see how necessary a world of pains and troubles is to school an intelligence and make it a soul?  ~ John Keats, Letters of John Keats

  • Comments will be open periodically, but personal reflection is encouraged in lieu of.

“Knowledge is knowing that we cannot know.”
~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Blog by DazyDayWriter @ work in SunnyRoomStudio: all rights reserved.

Winter Grass

Welcome to WEEK 15 of Beyond Self 2012 in SunnyRoomStudio.  Today I simply want to provide a quote and let you interpret it — in your journals, during your weekly meditation, or both.  Zen is simplicity.  And often other things, even excessive thought, direct us away from simplicity.

In a snowfall that covers the winter grass a white heron
uses his own whiteness to disappear.

~ Dogen Zenji (1200-1253; Japanese Zen Master)

Thank you so much for participating in this retreat.
Two weeks remain: December 21 and December 28th.

If you missed a week along the way,
browse retreat links here: Beyond Self 2012.
Or consult the sidebar menu for the following posts:

 Week One: Extend Your Gaze
Week Two:
Always Evaluating
Week Three:
Being Brevity
Week Four:
Entanglement
Week Five:
Beyond Attachment
Week Six:
Eternal Nature
Week Seven:
If Only
Week Eight:
Nonresistance
Week Nine:
Caught Up
Week Ten:
Daily Life
Week Eleven:
Just Look
Week Twelve:
Transcendence
Week Thirteen: Awareness
Week Fourteen: Steadiness

Reminder: Comments are closed during our retreat,
so you can focus on your spiritual practice via a journal or meditation.

Blog posts by DazyDayWriter @ work in SunnyRoomStudio: all rights reserved.

Steadiness

Welcome to Week 14 of Beyond Self 2012 in SunnyRoomStudio.  We have come a long way since early September.  And with only 3 more weeks left in December, our retreat will close on the 28th of this month with Week 17.  I hope you have been challenged to look within and to see things from a slightly different vantage point.  But I also hope this informal retreat has provided energy and motivation for your unique spiritual journey.  Just learning how to “sit” (meditate) can be quite an achievement.  Pascal tells us that …

All human evil comes from a single cause,
man’s inability to sit still in a room
.
~ Blaise Pascal

His opinion may sound extreme, but maybe he’s right.
It’s good food for thought at least.

 WEEK FOURTEEN: Beyond Self 2012

Week One: Extend Your Gaze
Week Two:
Always Evaluating
Week Three:
Being Brevity
Week Four:
Entanglement
Week Five:
Beyond Attachment
Week Six:
Eternal Nature
Week Seven:
If Only
Week Eight:
Nonresistance
Week Nine:
Caught Up
Week Ten:
Daily Life
Week Eleven:
Just Look
Week Twelve:
Transcendence
Week Thirteen: Awareness

Sitting quietly, doing nothing, spring comes
and the grass grows by itself.

~ Zen Proverb

Feeling inspired to do something is different than simply “doing” for the sake of doing.  There is a ineffable truth behind activity that feels inspired, poetic, or joyful.  And it seems to spring from something more than physical or mental exertion of the strictly “mortal” variety.  Have you noticed the difference?  Are you aware of the difference?

When my best ideas come to mind, they feel inspired.  They feel “right” and “true.”  They also seem to arrive unwilled and unsought.  Gifts, perhaps, or simply intuitive awareness.  Or is it a matter of being connected to “source” … to the cosmos … to the universal energy that created infinity?  I’m not sure, but what I have noticed is that quality ideas don’t come to me unless I have first silenced my mind.  Maybe not even intentionally, but after periods of quiet, somehow the ideas are there.

  • And such ideas resonate with me in a way that “artificial thinking” never does.
  • How would you describe thinking that springs from the mind without a connection to anything beyond self?
  • Of course, the ego wants us to believe that “we” are the thinkers.  We, alone.  But how could that be true?
  • I put assumption-making in the same category as artificial thinking.  When we “assume” we know the interior world of another person, our “assumptions” are mostly derived from the ego that is looking, and certainly not from an enlightened perspective.  Nor are such assumptions connected to reality.
  • What is the result?  Does this habitual mind pattern enhance your day, your life, or does it merely alienate those in your presence?

 Only in quiet waters do thing mirror themselves undistorted.
Only in a quiet mind is adequate perception of the world.

~ Hans Margolius

Clearly, there is a profound connection between seen and unseen forces.  Between conditioned mind thinking and elevated perception.  One is from a reactive mind.  The other flows from an internal steadiness, from something deeper than the moment at hand.  Can you tell the difference?  Are you growing in awareness?  Do you see this dynamic at work in your life?

  • Here I have to draw on the life work of Dr. David R. Hawkins.  An expert on mental processes, Dr. Hawkins passed away in the fall, I believe, but here is a partial bio from his website.
  • Sir David R. Hawkins, M.D., Ph.D. is a nationally renowned psychiatrist, physician, researcher, spiritual teacher and lecturer. The uniqueness of his contribution to humanity comes from the advanced state of spiritual awareness known as ” Enlightenment,” “Self–Realization,” and “Unio Mystica.”  Rarely, if ever, has this spiritual state occurred in the life of an accomplished scientist and physician. Therefore, Dr. Hawkins is uniquely qualified to present a spiritual path that is scientifically compelling to modern society.  Author of more than eight books, including Power vs. Force: The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior, Dr. Hawkins’s work has been translated into more than 17 languages.

Dr. Hawkins created a map of consciousness that differentiates between power and force by assigning a numerical value to various states of energy (or energy fields).  You may find yourself resisting this approach, this quantification of human behavior, but there is merit in exploring it nonetheless.  For instance, energy fields that are considered to be powerful include: courage, neutrality, willingness, acceptance, reason, love, joy, peace, enlightenment.  Conversely, energy fields that are merely based on “force” and are therefore lacking in personal power include: shame, guilt, apathy, grief, fear, desire, anger, pride.

He believed that one person holding a consciousness level of 500 or above could counterbalance the energy of 750,000 individuals below level 200 on the consciousness levels.

  •  What kind of energy are you putting out there each second? 

Remember, the goal here isn’t to agree or disagree with Dr. Hawkins.  That is ego.  That is the conditioned mind wanting to be right.  That is artificial thinking that isn’t connected to anything beyond self.

The goal, I would suggest, is to look for something useful or helpful via his message.  To realize (and appreciate) our interconnectedness via consideration of his life work.  Only by letting go of your “assumptions” will you find merit in anything beyond your own habitual thoughts.  And only by moving beyond reactivity to understanding will you grow in the spiritual sense.

Spend some time this week on the bench of enlightenment.  Build a spiritual steadiness within.  Put positive energy into the universe.  See if you can calm your reactive mind so others in your presence might benefit.  After all, life is really not about “you” … it’s about the gift of life and sharing that gift with others in ways that are peaceful, constructive, and knowing.

A gift is anything you don’t take for granted.  What does that include?  It can include everything, can’t it?  Inspired thoughts, daydreams, talents, breathing, time, awareness, nature, silence, intelligence, questions, listening, creating, joys, and sorrows.  Life itself in all its many forms and expressions.  So who among us isn’t rich in gifts?  ~ D.A. Hickman, Kindred Spirit Quotes

Enjoy your week.  And thanks for visiting SunnyRoomStudio.

See you next Friday for Week 15 of Beyond Self 2012. 

We visit others as a matter of social obligation.
How long has it been since we have visited with ourselves?

~ Morris Adler

Since comments are closed for this retreat, you might enjoy keeping a journal instead.

Blog posts by DazyDayWriter @ work in SunnyRoomStudio: all rights reserved.

True silence is the rest of the mind, and is to the spirit what sleep is to the body, nourishment and refreshment. ~ William Penn

Awareness

Welcome to Week 13 of Beyond Self 2012 in SunnyRoomStudio.  Based on my study of Zen last summer, this informal spiritual retreat may be only a beginning for some of you.  For others, this retreat has been a good refresher.

Where are you at in your spiritual evolution?

Was there a catalyst that led to a decision to follow a spiritual path in life, or was it more of a gradual awakening?

Or are you still waiting for the right moment, the right opportunity, to delve into spiritual matters more purposefully?

 Still round the corner there may wait, a new road or a secret gate.
~ J. R. R. Tolkien

WEEK THIRTEEN: Beyond Self 2012

Week One: Extend Your Gaze
Week Two:
Always Evaluating
Week Three:
Being Brevity
Week Four:
Entanglement
Week Five:
Beyond Attachment
Week Six:
Eternal Nature
Week Seven:
If Only
Week Eight:
Nonresistance
Week Nine:
Caught Up
Week Ten:
Daily Life
Week Eleven:
Just Look
Week Twelve:
Transcendence

It is great wisdom to know how to be silent and to look at neither the remarks, nor the deeds, nor the lives of others.
~
St. John of the Cross

During the second half of our retreat, we are sitting on the bench of enlightenment.  We are considering ourselves in the context of silence.  And we are finding peace in meditation.  But, undoubtedly, you are encountering points of resistance along the way.  Places where your conditioned mind springs into action.  Times when your thoughts won’t let you rest.  When your attachment to your own ideas clouds your vision and impedes your willingness to look beyond self for spiritual maturity.  How have you handled those points of resistance?

Are you growing in awareness? 

Do you see yourself more clearly now?  Or are you still surprised when those habitual reactions surface, often when least expected?  But even with that, are you beginning to notice how your automatic mind reactions cause you to suffer needlessly?  Or are you still enamored with self, with the resistance you seem to bring to everything?

At some point, the illusion breaks down and the opening for the start of the spiritual quest commences. The quest turns from without to within and the search for answers begins. ~ David R. Hawkins

  • This week try to simply focus on awareness.  Pay attention to thoughts and ideas that are no longer useful to you.  This is a great time of year to practice this.  During the holidays, it’s especially easy to revert to habits of old.  To become totally absorbed by the expectations of a conformist society, to let family or friends dictate priorities.  To revert to an “unconscious state,” per Eckhart Tolle.
  • Where is the liberation you seek?
  • When you find yourself not understanding something … it’s a good sign.  You may be moving beyond self, becoming free of the cultural identity you thought was you all these years.  Stay with the process.  Let silence via meditation be your guide.

Be master of mind rather than mastered by mind. ~ Zen Saying

Thanks so much for being here.

I look forward to seeing you next Friday for Week 14 of Beyond Self 2012.

I hope you are following with a journal,
as comments are closed during this retreat.

Strive to understand the world via experiences that serve as lasting catalysts for profound inner exploration.  ~ D.A. Hickman, Kindred Spirit Quotes

Blog posts by DazyDayWriter @ work in SunnyRoomStudio: all rights reserved.